Maryland Street 
Liverpool John Moore’s Student Union is housed in the Haigh Building in Maryland Street. Research suggests that the street itself is named in homage to Mr Hunter, a Virginia tobacco merchant who lived in Mount Pleasant and whose gardens once extended out into the street. The LJMU building is named after a long serving Union secretary by the name of Sheila Haigh and was officially opened in 1983. The Haigh is constructed on the former plot of ten old residential properties dating back to the early 19th century. Back then these houses looked out onto a green landscape of trees and gardens with the Presbyterian Church of Rodney Street and Hardman Street’s Church of St. Phillip being the major properties of the neighbourhood. Later the Covent of Notre Dame would build upon a large portion of this empty land and today the university uses this as part of its Mount Pleasant Campus.
In the 1890s some residents of the Haigh part of Maryland Street included:
No.4 - Here lived James Wilson, a 53-year-old commercial traveller originally from Airdrie, Scotland. He and wife Elizabeth shared the house with their seven children whose ages ranged from 3 to 18, as well as a twenty-year-old servant girl from Shropshire.
No.6 - Miss Mitchell – Details currently unknown
No.8 - Mrs Sampson - Details currently unknown
No.10 - Mrs Catherine Nicholson, a fifty-one-year-old widow resided in this property with Miss Alice Carr, her sister, and her niece, also called Alice.
No.12 Charles Delamare - Details currently unknown
No.14 - The home of the Reverend Emanuel Lewis Henshaw Thomas. He would leave Liverpool in 1893 to become the Reverend of the Scarborough Unitarian Church, serving until 1900. He was seen as a great literary and linguistic talent who wrote extensively as a translator and a scholar.
No.16 - George Tyrell, a tailor’s foreman – Further details currently unknown
No.18 - Raymond Steinforth a fifty-six-year-old solicitor originally born in British India. He shared the house with his wife Ermenida and two teenage daughters Laura and Edith, along with a domestic servant, Winifred Nicholson.
No.20 - Mrs Elizabeth Sherlock, an eighty-year-old widower and former school mistress lived at this address. Sophia and Eliza Sherlock, her middle-aged unmarried daughters also lived here with their Irish servant Elizabeth O’Toole.

Maryland Street 

Liverpool John Moore’s Student Union is housed in the Haigh Building in Maryland Street. Research suggests that the street itself is named in homage to Mr Hunter, a Virginia tobacco merchant who lived in Mount Pleasant and whose gardens once extended out into the street. The LJMU building is named after a long serving Union secretary by the name of Sheila Haigh and was officially opened in 1983. The Haigh is constructed on the former plot of ten old residential properties dating back to the early 19th century. Back then these houses looked out onto a green landscape of trees and gardens with the Presbyterian Church of Rodney Street and Hardman Street’s Church of St. Phillip being the major properties of the neighbourhood. Later the Covent of Notre Dame would build upon a large portion of this empty land and today the university uses this as part of its Mount Pleasant Campus.

In the 1890s some residents of the Haigh part of Maryland Street included:

No.4 - Here lived James Wilson, a 53-year-old commercial traveller originally from Airdrie, Scotland. He and wife Elizabeth shared the house with their seven children whose ages ranged from 3 to 18, as well as a twenty-year-old servant girl from Shropshire.

No.6 - Miss Mitchell – Details currently unknown

No.8 - Mrs Sampson - Details currently unknown

No.10 - Mrs Catherine Nicholson, a fifty-one-year-old widow resided in this property with Miss Alice Carr, her sister, and her niece, also called Alice.

No.12 Charles Delamare - Details currently unknown

No.14 - The home of the Reverend Emanuel Lewis Henshaw Thomas. He would leave Liverpool in 1893 to become the Reverend of the Scarborough Unitarian Church, serving until 1900. He was seen as a great literary and linguistic talent who wrote extensively as a translator and a scholar.

No.16 - George Tyrell, a tailor’s foreman – Further details currently unknown

No.18 - Raymond Steinforth a fifty-six-year-old solicitor originally born in British India. He shared the house with his wife Ermenida and two teenage daughters Laura and Edith, along with a domestic servant, Winifred Nicholson.

No.20 - Mrs Elizabeth Sherlock, an eighty-year-old widower and former school mistress lived at this address. Sophia and Eliza Sherlock, her middle-aged unmarried daughters also lived here with their Irish servant Elizabeth O’Toole.

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